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marlow
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http://icahn.mssm.edu/departments-and-institutes/developmental-and-regenerative-biology
 

Marlow Lab - Research

Germline stem cells, fertility and polarity.

    We investigate the molecular pathways and cell biological events that establish the body axis using genetic, molecular, cell biological, and embryological approaches. We have investigated the function of Buc, a protein that is essential to establish the earliest asymmetries during oogenesis.

    We have defined the earliest stages when Buc localizes asymmetrically in the oocyte, used transgenic models to understand how Buc is regulated, and identified novel proteins that interact with Buc.  These studies have provided insight into the molecular and cellular basis of oocyte patterning and downstream events. We identified a feedback amplification mechanism initiated by self-assembly of Buc, which interacts with evolutionarily conserved RNA binding proteins to assemble an ancient non-membrane bound compartment. We uncovered functions for Buc-binding partners in patterning and germline specification. Given the dependence of maternal processes on RNA regulation, we adapted the MS2-MCP RNA-labeling system to study genome activation and RNA localization in zebrafish.

    We have also used genetic approaches in zebrafish to investigate the development of the nervous system and generate new animal models of disease.  We showed that mutation of kif5Aa causes phenotypes reminiscent of the peripheral neuropathies and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia, a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by slow progressive retrograde degeneration of axons. Our work illustrated a cell-type specific requirement for Kif5Aa in mitochondrial transport, and provided insight into these human diseases.  In another study, we identified independent requirements for Notch3 in the CNS and vascular systems, and showed that notch3 mutant zebrafish have phenotypes reminiscent of human CADASIL patients.

lab info



Florence Marlow
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
florence.marlow@mssm.edu

212-241-4160 (office / lab)
212-860-9279 (fax)

lab members:
Bertho, Sylvain
Lee, KathyAnn
Martin, Manon

see photos and more here.
mailto:florence.marlow@mssm.edu?subject=biekerlab.htmlbiekerlab.htmlbiekerlab.htmlmarlowlab.htmlshapeimage_15_link_0shapeimage_15_link_1shapeimage_15_link_2shapeimage_15_link_3shapeimage_15_link_4
key publications

2015
Campbell PD*, Heim AH*, Marlow FL.,
Maternal Kinesin-1 Kif5B regulates germ plasm assembly and cortical rotation-like events to specify germ cells and the dorsoventral axis. 
Development, Sep 1;142(17):2996-3008. *co-first authors.
Campbell PD, Chao JA, Singer RH, Marlow FL.,
Dynamic visualization of transcription and RNA subcellular localization in zebrafish. 
Development, Sep 1;142(17):2996-3008. 

2014
Campbell PD, Shen K, Sapio M, Glenn T, Talbot WS, Marlow FL.,
Unique function of Kinesin Kif5A in localization of mitochondria in axons.
The Journal of Neuroscience, October, 34(44):14717-14732.
Hartung O, Forbes MM, Marlow FL.,
Zebrafish vasa is required for germ cell differentiation and maintenance.  
Mol Reprod Dev., Sep 25. doi: 10.1002/mrd.22414.

Heim A, Rothhämel S, Hartung O, Ferriera, E Jenny A, Marlow FL.,
Oocyte polarity requires a Bucky ball dependent feedback amplification loop.
Development, Feb;141(4):842-54.

2013
Zaucker A, Mercurio S, Sternheim N, Talbot WS, Marlow FL.,
notch3 is essential for oligodendrocyte development and vascular integrity in zebrafish. 
Disease Models and Mechanisms, Sep;6(5):1246-59.

see more publications here.biekerpub.htmlshapeimage_17_link_0
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