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http://icahn.mssm.edu/departments-and-institutes/developmental-and-regenerative-biology
 

CDRB Primary Faculty Lab, Research/Secondary Faculty

laboratory
research faculty
Red blood cell differentiation. 
We study the transcriptional regulation of erythroid-specific gene expression and the cellular mechanisms by which these cells are established during hematopoiesis and in development.

Bieker Laboratory

Bieker, James J.

PROFESSOR

james.bieker@mssm.edu

212-241-4143

Disease and Development in Drosophila. 
We use the fruitfly Drosophila to generate models of human disease, specifically cancer and diabetes. We then (i) explore mechanisms and (ii) use robotics in a whole animal screen for drug therapeutics. We also use the developing fly eye to explore mechanisms of epithelial patterning. 

Cagan Laboratory

Cagan, Ross L.

PROFESSOR

ross.cagan@mssm.edu

212-241-1427

Heart development and regeneration. 
We are interested in deciphering transcriptional pathways controlling mammalian heart development. Uncovering signaling cascades underlying early heart development has great implications for the research of cardiac stem cell biology and etiology of human congenital heart disease.

Cai Laboratory

Cai, Chen-Leng

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

chenleng.cai@mssm.edu

212-824-8917

Liver development and regeneration. 
The Gouon-Evans lab is interested in understanding the liver development and regeneration in mice and human using pluripotent stem cells as a model system and cellular source for liver cell therapy.

Gouon-Evans Laboratory

Gouon-Evans, Valerie

RESEARCH PROFESSOR

valerie.gouon-evans@mssm.edu

212-659-4033

Adhesion and signaling in development. 
Our laboratory is interested in the mechanisms by which cell adhesion regulates signal transduction pathways to influence patterning and cell differentiation during development. Areas of specific research include skeletal myogenesis, and Hedgehog signaling in forebrain and facial patterning. 

Krauss Laboratory

Krauss, Robert S.

PROFESSOR

robert.krauss@mssm.edu

212-241-2177

Mammalian stem cell niche formation. 
Our lab is interested in the formation and function of stem cell niches, which we study in genetic mouse models of hair follicle development. Specifically we focus on the cell fate specification of hair follicle stem cell niche cells (dermal papilla) and on how niche cells activate stem cells during hair formation and regeneration.

Rendl Laboratory

Rendl, Michael

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

michael.rendl@mssm.edu

212-241-9593

Cell polarity and signaling. 
Our group focuses on Wnt signaling during axis specification and neurogenesis in Xenopus development.  Another area of interest relates to asymmetric cell division and cell polarity in both frog and mammalian models.

Sokol Laboratory

Sokol, Sergei Y.

PROFESSOR

sergei.sokol@mssm.edu

212-241-1757

Mammalian fertilization. 
Our laboratory investigates the molecular basis of gamete interactions during fertilization in mammals.

Wassarman Laboratory

Wassarman, Paul M. PROFESSOR

paul.wassarman@mssm.edu

212-241-8616

Vertebrate developmental signaling. 
Our laboratory studies growth factor signaling pathways that have important roles in mouse embryonic development, physiology and disease. In particular, our lab is interested in the general question of how biological specificity is acquired upon engagement of growth factor signaling.

Soriano Laboratory

Soriano, Philippe M.

PROFESSOR

philippe.soriano@mssm.edu

212-241-4552

Wnt-Frizzled signaling and cell polarity.
Our work focuses on the establishment of planar cell polarity (PCP) during patterning and organogenesis as regulated by the Wnt/Frizzled (Fz) pathways and interacting factors. Another area of research is the molecular dissection of Wnt/Fz signaling specificity between the Wnt/β-catenin and PCP pathways.

Mlodzik Laboratory

Mlodzik, Marek

PROFESSOR & CHAIRMAN

marek.mlodzik@mssm.edu

212-241-6516

Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC) / Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC)
The hESC core facility has been established to facilitate the transfer of this technology to the Mount Sinai community and other NY state affiliated institutions.http://www.mssm.edu/research/resources/shared-resource-facilities/human-embryonic-stem-cellshapeimage_35_link_0

D’Souza, Sunita L.

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

sunita.d'souza@mssm.edu

212-659-8248

Wnt signaling in early Xenopus development.
Our research focus is to understand roles for subcellular protein localization in Wnt signaling pathways, which are responsible for embryonic axis specification and cell movements during gastrulation in Xenopus embryos.

Itoh, Keiji

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

keiji.itoh@mssm.edu

212-241-7984

Nucleocytoplasmic traffic of proteins and nucleic acids,
focused on the traffic of transcription factors, of proteins that regulate the
phosphorylation of tau in Alzheimer disease, and on the access to the
nucleus of gene delivery vectors.

Radu, Aurelian

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

aurelian.radu@mssm.edu

212-241-9376

Mammalian fertilization. 
Our laboratory investigates the molecular basis of gamete interactions during fertilization in mammals.

Litscher, Eveline S.

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

eveline.litscher@mssm.edu

212-241-8620

Pluripotency network in ES cells. 
We are interested in employing both proteomic and genetic approaches to dissect the pluripotency network that governs self-renewal and differentiation potential of ES cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, and to further understand function of novel pluripotency factors in development and somatic cell reprogramming.

Wang Laboratory

Wang, Jianlong

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

jianlong.wang@mssm.edu

212-241-7425

Regulating gene expression mechanisms. 
A longstanding interest of the Chess lab is the study of unusual mechanisms involved in regulating gene expression.  Recently we have been developing approaches to allow the study of epigenetic regulation at the scale of the entire human genome.

Chess Laboratory

Chess, Andrew

PROFESSOR

andrew.chess@mssm.edu

212-241-9695

The role of epigenetic regulators in stem cell control. 
Our long-term goal is to elucidate the roles of epigenetics regulators in stem cell control using skin as a model system.

Ezhkova Laboratory

Ezhkova, Elena

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

elena.ezhkova@mssm.edu

212-241-7184

Cancer Target Discovery in Zebrafish.
We exploit the whole-animal and high-throughput capacity of the zebrafish embryo, together with validation studies in human cancer cells, to uncover cellular proteins/pathways that become essential in the presence of specific cancer mutations. The goal is to define novel, safer targets for systemic inhibition in patients.

Sidi Laboratory

Sidi, Samuel

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

samuel.sidi@mssm.edu

212-241-7087

Cell fate regulation in mammalian stem cells.
The focus of my research is to understand the molecular and cellular nature of the undifferentiated stem cell "states", and how such states are altered during a change in cell fate.

Lemischka Laboratory

Lemischka, Ihor R.

PROFESSOR

ihor.lemischka@mssm.edu

212-659-8228

Self renewal and differentiation of stem cells 
We are pursuing research in Systems Biology especially focused on gene networks and quantitative models describing and explaining self renewal and differentiation of stem cells in mouse and human.

Papatsenko, Dmitri

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

dmitri.papatsenko@mssm.edu

212-824-9337

RNAi Screen for Protein Kinases and Protein Phosphatases in Human ESCs.
Our researches focus on RNAi screening to identify protein kinases (PKs) an protein phosphatases (PPases)  required for human embryonic stem cells pluripotency, and further to dissect signaling pathway and biological profiling exerted by our identified PKs and PPases in ESCs.
secondary faculty

Xu, Pin-Xian

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

pinxian.xu@mssm.edu

Overview

The Department of Cell, Developmental & Regenerative Biology explores the events governing the development, patterning and regeneration of cells and organs. The main areas of research are focused on developmental signaling pathways, cell death, organogenesis, fertilization, stem cells, and cancer models. The study of biological mechanisms through a broad and multi-tiered approach reveals unifying principles of biological development, structure, and function with exquisite clarity, and provides important links to medical disorders and therapeutic potential.

Hematopoietic stem cells and their niche.
Primary research interest in defining the cellular and molecular nature of the hematopoietic stem cell niche, particularly the molecular cross-talk between stem cells and their niche.

Moore Laboratory

Moore, Kateri

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

kateri.moore@mssm.edu

212-659-8312

Blood and blood disorders.
We study mechanisms that sustain blood-forming stem and progenitor cell production throughout life and that are perturbed in disease.

Ghaffari Laboratory

Ghaffari, Saghi

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

saghi.ghaffari@mssm.edu

212-659-8271

Stem cells to model heart development and disease 
In our lab we are interested in understanding human heart development and disease. We are using the human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) model to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cell fate specification and disease in the early human heart.

Dubois Laboratory

Dubois, Nicole

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

nicole.dubois@mssm.edu

212-824-8946

Gene-environmental interaction during development.
Roles of Cdon and its interaction with environmental factors during development, particularly midline patterning of the forebrain and the face. 

Hong, Mingi

INSTRUCTOR mingi.hong@mssm.edu

212-241-9794

Pluripotency, Cellular Diversity, and Multicellularity. 
Pluripotent stem cells can regenerate any tissue in the body, but the ability to direct these versatile cells toward specific medical endpoints, such as tissue repair or replacement, has been slow to develop. Our research is expected to accelerate the use of pluripotent stem cells in humans with injury or disease in a controlled manner.

Zwaka Laboratory

Zwaka, Thomas

PROFESSOR

thomas.zwaka@mssm.edu

212-659-8293

Wnt signaling in vertebrate development 
We are interested in understanding molecular mechanisms of Wnt signaling that are essential for embryonic development.  We are also studying morphogenetic processes that regulate cell polarity and cell shape.

Ossipova, Olga

INSTRUCTOR

olga.ossipova@mssm.edu

212-241-7984

Retina disease and regeneration.
Timothy Blenkinsop's laboratory works to understand the basic biology of the adult human eye in an effort to reveal mechanisms for regeneration. We are currently focused on RPE and RPE related diseases.

Blenkinsop Laboratory

Blenkinsop, Timothy A.

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

timothy.blenkinsop@mssm.edu

212-659-8278

Mouse Genetics Shared Research Facility (MG)
The institutional Mouse Genetics Resource Facility has been established to provide the Mount Sinai research community with access to state-of-the-art facilities for the production of transgenic and knockout mice, as well as related rodent embryology techniques. On a fee-for-service basis, the facility will provide basic services.http://www.mssm.edu/research/resources/shared-resource-facilities/mouse-genetics/overviewshapeimage_74_link_0

Kelley, Kevin A.

RESEARCH PROFESSOR

kevin.kelley@mssm.edu

212-659-6866

Molecular influences on stem cell function.
We are studying the molecular mechanisms that underlie embryonic stem cell pluripotency and self-renewal. We are aiming to identify noncanonical pathways and how they contribute to ES cell identity and developmental processes, but also to understand their importance in adult stem cell populations and tissue homeostasis.

Dejosez, Marion

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

marion.dejosez@mssm.edu

212-659-8284

Germline stem cells, fertility and polarity.
(New page in progress)

Marlow Laboratory

Marlow, Florence

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

florence.marlow@mssm.edu

212-241-4160